The History of England

from Celts through 20th century

Archives for the ‘Education’ Category

EDUCATION IN ENGLAND

Category: Education

The  legal  basis  of  the  system  is  the  Education  Act  1944,  and  the  amendments  made  by  fourteen  Acts  of  Parliament  betwe­en  1946  and  1972.  The  1944  Act  prescribes  the  duty  of  govern­ment,  local  education  authorities  and  parents  in  a  system  which  is  compulsory  for  those  aged  five  to  sixteen,  and  which  contains  op­tional  preschool  and  […]



COMPULSORY SCHOOLING

Category: Education

Education  is  compulsory  between  the  ages  of  five  and  sixteen.  The  minimum  leaving  age  has  been  raised  from  fifteen  to  sixteen  in  1972—73.  Compulsory  schooling  is  divided  into  a  primary  and  secondary  stage.  The  transition  from  primary  to  secondary  schooling  is  normally  made  around  the  age  of  eleven.  Since  the  Education  Act,  1964,  gave  local  […]



PRIMARY EDUCATION

Category: Education

Primary  education  includes  three  age  ranges:  nursery  forchildren  under  five  years,  infants  from  five  to  seven  or  eight,  and  juniors  from  seven  or  eight  to  eleven  or  twelve  years.  Attendance  is  voluntary,  but  much  sought  after,  for  children  under  five.  They  may  attend  one  of  the  rare  publicly  maintained  nursery  schools,  an  independent  nursery  school,  […]



SECONDARY EDUCATION

Category: Education

Secondary  schools  are  generally  much  larger  than  primary  schools.  Over  half  have  between  400  and  800  pupils.  The  largest  schools  have  2,000.  There  were  5,400  maintained  secondary  schools  in  1970  with  3  million  pupils,  178  direct  grant  schools  with  119,000  pu­pils  and  2,775  independent  secondary  schools,  including  the  famous  “public1’  schools,  with  over  43,000  pupils.  […]



GRAMMAR SCHOOLS

Category: Education

In  the  last  twenty  years  the  public  schools  and  the  most  suc­cessful  grammar  schools  have  become  increasingly  alike:  and  the  increasing  movement  towards  comprehensive  schools,  which  threat­ens  both  of  them,  has  forced  them  into  a  friendly  alliance.  The  public  schools  have  become  more  concerned  with  intellectual  train­ing,  less  with  character-building:  the  big  grammar  schools  —  […]



PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Category: Education

In  a  very’separate  stream  of  their  own,  often  segregated  from  the  age  of  five  or.six,  are  the  children  at  the  independent  or  “public”  schools  which  for  the  past  two  decades  have  been  the  cause  of  more  controversy  than  any  other  British  institution.  Their  influence  on  the  present  British  power  structure  is  not  quite  what  it  […]



COMPREHENSIVES

Category: Education

For  six  years  up  to  1970  the  expansion  of  comprehensive  schools  and  the  gradual  weakening  of  the  grammar  schools  was  widely  associated  with  Labour  Party  policy,  at  odds  with  Conservative  opinion.  Butj,  in  fact,  the  movement  began  long  before  Labour  came  into  power  and  continued  afterwards.  The  pressure  for  “comp-  rehensivisation”  often  came  more  from  […]



LIFE AT SCHOOL AND THE LIFE OF THE SCHOOL

Category: Education

The  two  phrases  —  life  at  school  and  the  life  of  the  school  —  are  so  close  together  that  one  would  expect  them  to  be,  if  not  synony­mous,  yet  clearly  descriptive  of  the  same  thing.  How  far  is  this  true? Life  at  school  is  a  simple  objective  phrase  which  promises  no  more  than  an  account  […]



EDUCATION FOR TWO NATIONS – RICH AND POOR

Category: Education

An  unskilled  worker’s  child  has  a  six  times  higher  chance  of  being  a  poor  reader  than  a  child  of  a  professional  worker,  and  a  fif­teen  times  higher  chance  of  being  a  non-reader. Seven-year-olds  from  large  families  are  on  average  12  months  behind  seven-year-olds  from  small  families  in  their  reading.



SCHOOLS WHERE 11-YEAR-OLDS CAN’T READ AN EASY SENTENCE

Category: Education

About  one  in  five  non-immigrant  children  in  some  primary  schools  in  inner-city  areas  leave  at  11  unable  to  read  simple  sen­tences,  the  author  of  a  new  report  on  education  priority  areas  warned  yesterday.  The  difficulties  of  immigrant  children  are  even  more  marked.






superior papers