The History of England

from Celts through 20th century

Archives for the ‘Customs + Festivals’ Category

Holidays and Celebrations in the UK

Category: Customs + Festivals

There are eight public, or bank holidays in Great Britain, that is, days when banks and offices are closed. They are: Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year’s Day, Good Friday, Easter Monday, Mayday, Spring Bank Holiday and Late Summer Bank Holiday. The observance of these days is no longer limited to banks. All the public […]



English Customs and Traditions

Category: Customs + Festivals

Every nation and every country has its own customs and traditions. In Britain traditions play a more important part in the life of the people than in other countries. Englishmen are proud of their traditions and carefully keep them up. It has been the law for about three hundred years that all the theatres are […]



English Meals – customs

Category: Customs + Festivals

The English usually have 4 meals a day: breakfast, lunch, tea (5 o’clock), and dinner. Breakfast can be a full “English breakfast” of corn flakes with milk and sugar, or bacon and eggs, toast and marmalade, tea or coffee. Some people, however, have just a cup of tea or coffee with a toast. This is […]



English Meals

Category: Customs + Festivals

The English proverb says: every cook praises his own broth. One can not say English cookery is bad, but there is not a lot of variety in it in comparison with European cuisine. The English are very particular about their meals. The usual meals in England are breakfast, lunch, tea and dinner. Breakfast time is […]



English Halloween Customs

Category: Customs + Festivals

The celebration of All Saints Day or just Halloween takes place on October 31st. The tradition of Halloween began in the fifth century B.C. This day the Irish Celts celebrated their New Year at that time, because they organized their year according to the agricultural calendar and marked the transition from one year to the […]



British Traditions and Customs

Category: Customs + Festivals

British nation is considered to be the most conservative in Europe. It is not a secret that every nation and every country has its own customs and traditions. In Great Britain people attach greater importance to traditions and customs than in other European countries. Englishmen are proud of their traditions and carefully keep them up. […]



PUBLIC HOLIDAYS AND CELEBRATIONS

Category: Customs + Festivals

There  are  only  six  public  holidays  a  year  in  Great  Brit­ain,  that  is  days  on  which  people  need  not  go  in  to  work.  They  are:  Christmas  Day,  Boxing  Day,  Good  Friday,  Easter  Monday,  Spring  Bank  Holiday  (The  terra  bank  holiday  applies  also  to  Christmas  Day,  Boxing  Day  and  Easter  Monday,  and  dates  back  to  the  […]



NEW YEAR IN ENGLAND

Category: Customs + Festivals

In  England  the  New  Year  is  not  as  widely  or  as  enthusias­tically  observed  as  Christmas.  Some  people  ignore  it  comple­tely  and  go  to  bed  at  the  same  time  as  usual  on  New  Year’s Eve.  Many  others,  however,  do  celebrate  it  in  one  way  or  another,  the  type  of  celebration  varying  very  much  according  to  the  […]



Hogmanay Celebrations

Category: Customs + Festivals

Hogmanay  is  a  Scottish  name  for  New  Year’s  Eve,  and  is  a  time  for  merrymaking,  the  giving  of  presents  and  the  observance  of  the  old  custom  of  First-Footing.  One  of  the  most  interesting  of  Scottish  Hogmanay  celebrations  is  the  Flambeaux  Procession  at  Comrie,  Perthshire.  Such  pro­cessions  can  be  traced  back  to  the  time  of  the  […]



Tar-Barrel Burning

Category: Customs + Festivals

The  custom  of  men  welcoming  in  the  New  Year  by  carrying-  pans  of  blazing  tar  on  their  heads  is  still  kept  up  at  Allen­dale,  Northumberland,  on  New  Year’s  Eve.  Each  of  the  “carriers”,  in  fancy  costume,  balances  on  his  head  the  end  of  a  barrel  (or  “kit”)  filled  with  inflammable  material.  The  procession  is  timed  […]